Excelsior!

(Note: The final post from Indie Moines is copied below, for the permanent archival record. All new online writing from me will now be located on this site).

The Indie Moines blog will be shutting down in December 2014, per this post.

Changes Made

I’m not much of a New Year’s Resolution kind of guy, since I know that the holiday season and attendant travel actually extends until well after MLK Day in most years for my family, so it’s hard to get serious about making changes on January 1, when I know I’m likely to be on vacation somewhere decadent in the following few weeks. Lent always seems like a better arbitrary season for personal tweaks, as it falls after that extended holiday season, and bridges the spring season, when change is in the air already. Plus that whole 40 days and then it’s done thing is kind of nice, for some sorts of changes.

Autumn, too, finds us in a season of change, and that’s resonating with me right now. At home, Marcia is putting her gardens to bed for the winter, and we’ve recently acquired really awesome fluffy cold-weather bedding, and turned on the furnaces at work and home for the first time, creating that burnt dust smell that I strongly associate with winter’s approach. Golf season will probably wrap up in the next few weeks, and Marcia and I will return to work with our personal trainer in early November.

I’m looking at some health-related personal changes that month, too, since as a gentleman of an increasingly certain age, annoying things like cholesterol and sodium and blood sugar have, by circumstance, become items of deeper concern for me, requiring some modifications to long-held habits, many involving cheese, smoked meats and wine. I’ve also acquired a lot of new recording gear, and look forward to getting a home studio set up this winter to revive some long dormant creative activities as the snow flies and winds howl. Rage against the dying of the light . . . with guitar.

While these mostly quiet, personal, home-related changes are taking place, I’m also going to be making some more public changes in how I connect with the world in a digital format, which is how most of you reading this post have interacted with me over the years. You’ll see these rolling out in the next few days, so I’m leaving a description of them here in this post as a guide marker in case you can’t find me where you used to. Here’s the plan:

1. I’m permanently closing my Facebook account, including the Indie Moines group there. It used to be valuable to me as a promotional tool, but as Facebook has phased out organic placements of posts, I find myself connecting with an increasingly limited audience there, and the cost of time-wasting that occurs when I log in no longer offsets the benefit of doing so. Plus, you know, it’s Facebook. Been there, done that, tired of it.

2. While I don’t think it’s going to live up to the hype that it’s gained as the site that’s going to kill Facebook, I have joined Ello as an alternate social network for now. It’s still in beta, and it still requires an invitation to join, but if you are there, I am user @jericsmith, so feel free to add me to your noise or friends lists, and I’ll reciprocate. If you’d like an invitation, shoot me a note.

3. I’m going to maintain my Twitter account at @indiemoines, though I am re-branding my feed under my own name, rather than having the posts show up as having originated from Indie Moines. Same piffle and tripe, same location, just without the anonymity of the third party designation. It’s me tweeting in the first person now, not Indie Moines tweeting in the third.

4. And speaking of Indie Moines, the biggest change coming is this one: this domain expires this December, and I’m planning to retire the site at that point (though I will renew the domain registration, lest someone else snarf it up for nefarious purposes). Why am I doing this? From 1999 to 2007, my website and my blog were one and the same: J. Eric Smith Dot Com. But when I started blogging for a certain New York digital rag, and then that blew up and I set up Indie Albany in a fit of pique, and then I unexpectedly moved to Iowa and created Indie Moines as a continuation of the Indie Albany narrative, the website associated with my core brand — my name — began to languish in something of a netherworld between my professional and my creative life. This has allowed other J. Eric Smiths out there (there are a lot of us, surprisingly) to encroach on my digital turf, so, as with my Twitter account, I’m ready to reclaim my name and roll all of my online archives (dating back to 1995!) over to J. Eric Smith Dot Com, and to begin posting all new material there. This feels sensible since I rarely write about Des Moines or Iowa as specific topics anymore, instead focusing on things either larger or smaller or more national or more personal in scope, so the inquiries that Indie Moines generates don’t really have a lot of bearing on what I’m doing on the site at this point. So go ahead and click on one of those links above to my name website . . . look familiar? Same things that exist at Indie Moines, just under my own name, with some professional tabs preserved from my work sites for the folks interested in those sorts of things. Shift your bookmarks now if you’d like, as anything that appears here over the next two months will also appear there, and then at some point, this site will vanish. Poof!

There might be some other changes coming, too, but these are the ones that are feeling good and right for me now, as I watch the leaves fall and prepare myself — physically, psychologically, creatively, digitally — for the winter months ahead. Sing it, John Cale, since you know what I mean . . .

The Fame of States

Does your state have a particular claim to fame with which it is closely associated?

For reasons too complicated to explain (like most things in my brain), I posed this question in a writing project recently, and then wondered how to answer it. On a gut instinct whim, I opened Google, and typed a search stream in the form of “Famous [State Name] [space],” then noted the first suggestion made by Google’s auto-fill engine. So, for instance, here’s what the search for Alabama looked like:

famousalabama

Famous Alabama Football Players? Okay, I’ll buy that . . . since the correlation between “Alabama” and “Football Players” does seem to be pretty strong in public perception. But what happens when you run this same test with all of the other states and major territories or affiliated entities in the United States? Do the correlations still ring as strongly? Let’s look and see!

As was the case with alphabetical alpha Alabama, college (and occasionally professional) athletics are among the most common categories of “Famous State” suggestions, as follows (with some notes):

  • Alabama Football Players
  • Colorado Rockies (Could also be the mountains, of course).
  • Idaho Potato Bowl (Interesting that the Bowl Game scores higher than the potatoes it is named after).
  • Kansas City Royals (Go Beloved Royals!).
  • Kentucky Derby Winners (This is the only animal related response in the mix, if people are looking for the horses, not the jockeys).
  • Minnesota Twins (Go Marcia’s Beloved Twinkies!)
  • Nebraska Fans (Wonder why fans over players? Is it because the Cornhuskers are so hated that it’s hard to imagine what famous people might like them? Probably).
  • Ohio State Football Players (Complete with mug shots).
  • Oklahoma Football Players
  • Oregon Runner (The singular is interesting. There’s only one famous Oregon runner?)
  • Texas Rangers (Could be the law enforcement types, too).
  • Utah Jazz Players (Because it’s Utah, we know these are basketball players, and not saxophone players).
  • Washington Redskins (Sad that Washington State’s search fame hinges on an ethnically offensive sports team mascot from the other side of the country).

Some states’ claims to fame are similarly linked to their colleges, though not for their athletic programs, but instead for those who matriculated from their institutions of higher learning:

  • Arizona State Alumni
  • Georgia Tech Alumni
  • Maryland Alumni
  • Michigan Alumni
  • Virginia Tech Alumni

The next most common category of responses are related to food, with some interesting variations between “restaurant(s)” and “food(s)” perhaps indicating where people dine out more, and where people eat in more:

  • Connecticut Pizza
  • Delaware Food
  • Guam Food
  • Illinois Food
  • Louisiana Restaurants
  • Mississippi Restaurants
  • Missouri Food
  • New Jersey Food
  • New York Restaurants
  • North Carolina Foods (interesting that this is the only plural incidence of “food” . . . apparently the Tarheel State does not have one singular signature cuisine item?)
  • Pennsylvania Food
  • South Carolina Food (Complete with organ meat).

Two states improve on the food cluster by prioritizing sudsy libations over eats:

  • Vermont Beer (A little surprising).
  • Wisconsin Beer (Not at all surprising).

Some states are apparently best known (or searched) for their cultural resources:

  • Arkansas Rappers (Really?!? Okay, I’ve got to do some research here and figure out what’s going down in the Little Rock hip hop scene).
  • Maine Artists
  • Massachusetts Artists
  • New Mexico Artists
  • North Dakota Artists (Okay, this one surprises me. Sorry, North Dakota. Just saying).
  • Rhode Island Actors (Because Providence is the Hollywood of Southern New England).
  • Tennessee Authors (I wonder if “Tennessee Williams” skews this one?)

There are a cluster of states whose geography resonates most strongly with Google searchers:

  • Alaska Cities (Are people surprised to learn there are more than one?)
  • California Beaches
  • Florida Beaches
  • Hawaii Beaches
  • Puerto Rico Beach (Is there only one?)
  • South Dakota Landmarks (Plural? Does that infer that there’s something other than Mount Rushmore?)
  • West Virginia Hotel (Just one? Why does that make me think about some weird combo of The Shining and Deliverance?)

A couple of states apparently raise the question “Who the heck actually lives there?”

  • Montana Residents
  • New Hampshire Residents

Sadly enough, there are a few regions in the United States that apparently have nothing famous worth searching for, including our Nation’s Federal District:

  • American Samoa NOTHING
  • District of Columbia NOTHING
  • U.S. Virgin Islands NOTHING
  • Northern Mariana Islands NOTHING

Then there are some weird ones that don’t quite fit into any other category:

  • Indiana Jones Quotes (Harrison Ford’s limited dialog in an action movie series is more searchable than everything else in the Hoosier State? Wow).
  • Nevada Brothels (Well, yeah, sex sells, apparently even more than casinos do).
  • Wyoming Attorney (There’s only one? Apparently that’s enough).

And, then, finally, there’s the state where I’ve made my home for the past three years. I figured that when I searched for “Famous Iowa [blank]” that I might get “Iowa State Football Players” or “Iowa Wrestlers” or “Iowa Corn” or something along those lines. But how wrong I was, since here’s a screen capture of the actual result:

famousiowaMurders? The most searchable thing in Iowa is homicide?!? Well, I guess I might have done my part to help that out when I visited and wrote about the Villisca Axe Murder House, but, still, why is Iowa the only state in the Nation where searchers are most interested in the taking of someone else’s life?

This remains an open question for me. I’d welcome your thoughts on what the answer might be!

Five by Five Books #6: “The Flounder” (1977) by Günter Grass

(Note: This is one of an occasional and ongoing series of reviews of my favorite novels, structured by covering five facets of my reading experiences, each in five sentences).

What’s it about? At bottom line, this is a book is about men, and women, and food, so how can you go wrong with that, right? More descriptively, The Flounder (Der Butt in its original German) tells the tale of an immortal fisherman, the women he has loved through the centuries, and the talking fish who meddles in their lives, incidentally instituting the patriarchate in the process. Loosely anchored in the Brothers Grimm fairy tale, The Fisherman and His Wife, Günter Grass’ epic Flounder blends absurdly cerebral elements (e.g. a court trial of the talking flounder, who is being persecuted by militant feminists), with visceral, earthy depictions of human bodies and the fuel (food) that powers them, some of it beautiful and sweet, some of it bloody and filthy, most of it some combination of all of the above. The main narrative of the book is broken into nine parts (called months), through which the Fisherman tells his pregnant current wife, Ilsebill, about the women (all cooks) who came before her, all the way back into the blissfully oblivious (for men anyway) matriarchy of the Neolithic era, when people ate in private, then gathered in groups to move their bowels together, socially. The book also provides a reasonably accurate history of the politics and culture of the Vistula River region around Danzig/Gdansk, which is sometimes German, sometimes Polish, sometimes Lithuanian, sometimes its own Free City, but always distinctive and recognizable in Grass’ depictions.

Who wrote it? Günter Grass is arguably post-war Germany’s most famous — if often controversial — cultural figures, a left-leaning, politically-active playwright, novelist, sculptor, illustrator and poet, whose work is frequently categorized as an integral part of the Vergangenheitsbewältigung (“Coming to terms with the past”) movement in contemporary German arts. Grass was born in the Free City of Danzig (now Gdansk, Poland), and his works are often set there, in the crook of the Baltic Sea where eastern and western empires have clashed for centuries, all of them coveting the deep water port and strategic importance of the ancient burg, which has as a result changed hands (politically) at least 15 times in the past 1,000 years. His most famous book, The Tin Drum (1959), was the opening salvo of his so-called Danzig Trio, and it was later made into an Academy Award and Cannes Palm d’Or winning film, released in 1979 — just after The Flounder received its first English pressing. Grass has won numerous awards and plaudits throughout his career, including the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999 for his book, My Century. He continues to write, and provoke, to this day, most recently earning headlines on our shores for his 2012 poem “Europe’s Disgrace,” in which he lambastes the European Union for condemning Greece to poverty through its (mis?)-handling of the sovereign debt crisis.

When and where did I read it? I first read The Flounder in Newport, Rhode Island, in the summer of 1980, as America’s Cup 12 meter sailboats trained, transited and raced outside of my bedroom window above Fort Adams State Park. I had seen the film adaptation of The Tin Drum a few months before we moved from Long Island (after four seminal years there) to Rhode Island, and read that novel soon thereafter, surprised and delighted to discover that there was a long and important second part of the book that had not been included in the film. Soon after we arrived in Newport, I visited the public library downtown, and am fairly certain that The Flounder was the first book I ever checked out there. It’s a long, somewhat difficult book, and I know I had to renew it a couple of times before I finished; oddly (it seemed to me) nobody else wanted to check it out. The book’s bizarre potpourri of water, and fish, and food, and women, and history, and politics, indelibly underpins my memories of a summer spent on the shore, during political season (John Anderson for President, anybody?), while eagerly pursuing women, and food, ideally at the same time.

Why do I like it? Like I said, men and women and food, so what’s not to like? Actually, the thing that impressed me most on first reading was the book’s rich structure, the layers of history, with poetry and prose intertwined, and an absurd and satirical contemporary story line providing the anchor from which upon thousands of years worth of deliciously dirty, meaty, sweaty, sensual yarns and tales are spun, ostensibly to entertain a pregnant woman through the nine months of her term. Grass’ deep sense of place (the Vistula estuary, Kashubia, Pomerania, Danzig), and his vast affection for food and its preparation are contagious and memorable, and I found myself wanting to reproduce many of the recipes described in the book, even though many of them would be viewed as disgusting my most modern gourmands, just for the experience of eating things we generally don’t eat anymore. The (titular) Flounder is an amazing character — a mystery, a meddler, a bon vivant, a maker of bad jokes and puns, a know-it-all in both the best and worst senses of that phrase — as are the 11 cooks, all powerful women, each in their own ways, flawlessly envisioned and embodied by a master writer. Credit must be given to Ralph Manheim for his English translation of this knotty (and naughty) work; the language never feels forced, nor dumbed down, nor stiff, and I think that’s a rare and significant accomplishment in a field that’s largely invisible or forgotten by most readers of foreign novels.

A five sentence sample text: “He, the one and only, the talking Flounder, who has been stirring me up for centuries, knew all the recipes that had been used for cooking his fellows, first by the heathen and later as a Christian Lenten fish (and not only on Friday). With an air of detachment and a glint of irony in his slanting eyes, he could sing his praises as a delicacy: ‘Yes, my son, we happen to be one of the finer fishes. In the distant future, when you imbecilic men, you eternal babes in arms, will at last have minted coins, dated your history, and introduced the patriarchate, in short, shaken off your mothers’ breasts, when after six thousand years of ever-loving womanly care you will at last have emancipated yourselves, then my fellows and relatives, the sole, the brill, the plaice, will be simmered in white wine, seasoned with capers, framed in jelly, deliciously offset by sauces, and served on Dresden china. My fellows will be braised, glazed, poached, broiled, filleted, ennobled with truffles, flamed in cognac, and named after marshals, dukes, the prince of Wales, and the Hotel Bristol. Campaigns, conquests, land grabs!”

PRIOR FIVE BY FIVE BOOK REVIEWS:

#1: Engine Summer by John Crowley (1979)

#2: Skin by Kathe Koja (1993)

#3: Nova by Samuel R. Delany (1968)

#4: Titus Groan/Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake (1946/1950)

#5: The Islanders by Christopher Priest (2011)

Click on The Flounder to order your own copy.

Click on The Flounder to order your own copy.

Mélange

1. It’s September? It’s September. It’s September?!? It’s September! It’s September. It’s September . . . (it’s September) . . .

2. I was sorry to hear of Glenn Cornick’s passing this week. He was the bass player on the first three Jethro Tull albums, as well as playing in a few precursor bands, and co-writing the group’s first single, “Aeroplane,” mistakenly credited to “Jethro Toe.” He was a fantastic musician, and it’s hard to imagine how such signature early Tull songs as “Living in the Past” or “Bouree” would have been so wonderful without his tasty chops holding them together. Click those two links in the prior sentence, and actually listen to the bass. Incredible stuff, truly. He had a fine post-Tull career as well, that I wrote about in a post a few years back about Heavy Organ Music, and I highly recommend his work with Wild Turkey, Paris and Karthago, if you can find it. (Paris also featured the brilliant Bob Welch, who has also flown away from us, sadly, as I wrote about here). I was “friends” with Glenn Cornick on Facebook for a couple of years, back when I was more profligate in my social media practices, and his communications there were always fun, enthusiastic, engaging, and endearing. He seemed to be a generous man who loved and was proud of his family, as well as a gifted musician who played an important role in an important band for me. Here’s wishing his friends and loved ones peace through difficult times.

John Smith, International Terrorist? Apparently so, until proven innocent.

Is this the passport photo of John Smith, International Terrorist? Apparently so, until proven innocent, again and again.

3. As noted in prior posts, Marcia and I had an amazing time in Europe last month, celebrating our 25th Anniversary. One of the things that we most appreciated was the excellent public transportation opportunities available to us, where we could effortlessly move between four sovereign nations via clean and timely trains, and could also move freely around our chosen cities in a variety of trams, buses, trains and autos. Our entire passport control experience on entering Europe was a pleasant, two-minute interview at Flughafen Frankfurt, Germany, while carrying our backpacks, and keeping our shoes, belts, jewelry and outer clothing on our bodies throughout the entire procedure. Compare and contrast this with our experience on arriving in Houston International Airport, where we waited in long lines, were yelled at more than once by airport security personnel, had to remove various items of clothing, and dismantle our traveling packs and — worst of all — where I was, once again, singled out, isolated, and treated as a security threat for no offense graver than being named “John Smith.” This is the fourth (or fifth?) time this has happened to me when returning from abroad in the post 9/11 era, so while I’m getting used to it on one level, it never ceases to deeply offend and aggrieve me to have to be separated from my traveling companions and put into “supplemental screening” rooms after having my passport confiscated by airport security staff. In Houston, they would not let Marcia stay with me, and I was put under surveillance in a secure office immediately adjacent to the quarantine room where, presumably, anybody exhibiting Ebola symptoms would be held. I don’t want to be too much of a drama queen about this, but, you know what? I served my country, honorably, for a long time, and it feels really, really, really wrong for me to be treated this way when I return home after traveling abroad. It’s obviously some sort of profiling based on my very common name, but it seems that at one or more of these unfortunate stops, someone would look at the unique number on my passport and make a note in a computer somewhere that I’m really not that John Smith (whoever he might be), and that I should be able to enter the country where I was born and have lived and worked my entire life without causing security staff to put their hands on their pistols. Is that too much to ask? I don’t think it is.

4.  Another thing I enjoyed about our time in Europe: I had no cell phone coverage or connection, so I would check in via the hotel’s business center or our Netbook occasionally, but otherwise was fairly blissfully disconnected from the digital world for most of the day while we rambled about some of Europe’s great cities, seeing sites, taking pictures, drinking beer, and eating all of the things, all of them. It was effortless and delightful, and I’ve tried to eliminate a lot of online connections since returning home (e.g. sorry if I am not your Facebook friend anymore, nothing personal, really) to preserve that sense of actively living in the real world, without feeling obligated to monitor the virtual one, continually. That being said, I hereby authorize anybody reading this article to punch me in the head repeatedly if I ever succumb to writing one of my least favorite internet memes, wherein highly-connected dooders or doodesses cut him/herselves off from all electronic toys for a day/week/month/whatever, and then blog about it as though the experience were analogous to living in a Somali refugee camp for two years. It’s not that dramatic to be disconnected, people, honest. Most of our internet activities are nothing but habits, and if we make a little effort to break said habits (since most of them are bad habits, if we’re honest with ourselves, right?), and successfully do so, then . . . . well, then, nothing, because it’s not really a big deal. Seriously. And if you ever liken misplacing your Smartphone or closing your Facebook account to losing basic fundamental human requirements like food, water, and real face-to-face contact with peers and loved ones, then you’re kind of a schmuck, honestly, and there’s probably a reason why you don’t function very well in the real world. Just saying.

Home from Europe

Marcia and I made it back late yesterday from our nearly two-week trip to Europe. It was a wonderful way to mark and celebrate our 25th Anniversary. I’ve put our photo album up on Flickr, if you’d like to see what we saw. If you click on the photo of me below — with the expression that I wore most of my time throughout this trip (and if you know me well, you know I don’t smile very often) — then click on any of the photos on the page that comes up, there will be explanations at the bottom of the page as to what you’re seeing, and navigation arrows at the sides to see other scenes. I’m still a bit jet-lagged, so might offer some other thoughts on the trip later, but suffice for now to say it was magnificent, and I’m pleased beyond words to have been able to share the experience with Marcia. It was a great beginning to our next 25 years together.

Happy camper at Restaurant Willem in Amsterdam. Click the image to see the other photos.

Happy camper at Restaurant Willem in Amsterdam. Click the image to see the other photos.

Y U NO UPDATE?!?

Because I am on vacation with Marcia, on an extended celebration of our 25th Anniversary. We’re marking the occasion in Europe:

Me in front of Rembrandt's "The Night Watch"in Amsterdam. Shine, shine, the light of good works shine . . .

Me in front of Rembrandt’s “The Night Watch” in Amsterdam. Shine, shine, the light of good works shine . . .

Marcia and I in Luxembourg. Just because.

Me and Marcia in Luxembourg. Grand Duchy FTW!!!

Here's Marcia and I in front of the Rheinturm, in Dusseldorf.

And here’s we are in front of the Rheinturm, in Dusseldorf.

This is the site of the original Kling Klang Studio in Dusseldorf, where Kraftwerk changed the world.

This is the site of the original Kling Klang Studio in Dusseldorf, where Kraftwerk changed the world of music forever. I could see it from our hotel room. Wow!

Final selfie in Amsterdam, the day before we return home. What a wonderful trip!

Final selfie in Amsterdam, the day before we return home. What a wonderful trip!

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