McPhersonville’s Moment in the Sun

On March 22, 2014, Wikipedia (the world’s sixth most trafficked website) featured “Burning of McPhersonville” as its “Picture of the Day,” prominently displayed on its front page. I’ve posted a screen capture below (click the image to see a larger, linked version):

burnmcpherThis was a jaw-dropping surprise for me to see, since McPhersonville is the teeny, tiny, remote, no longer incorporated Low Country South Carolina hamlet (we always call it “The Village”) where my ancestors have lived for generations and generations. (I am eleventh in line of descent from the first permanent English settler in South Carolina). One of the mentioned houses left standing during the burning of McPhersonville was, in fact, my family’s home at the time. (Though, in all fairness, they deserved to have it burnt down, too, as one of the largest slave-owning broods in the region. Just saying).

McPhersonville is so seemingly insignificant in the grand narrative of South Carolina that I actually had to be the one to create its Wikipedia page, on April 13, 2006. The only image I included in that original page was the William Waud sketch of the burning shown at left above, which all these years on has risen in stature to being named a Wikipedia Picture of the Day. Huh!

If you follow me on my Facebook page, then you’ve actually been looking at McPhersonville regularly for quite some time, since I use the following topo map as my cover image:

mcphtopo

I particularly love this map (found online), because right next to “downtown” McPhersonville, someone has hand annotated a surveying benchmark with the legend “Cocock.” Presumably, this is a misspelling of “Colcock,” the name of my mother’s mother’s family who owned this land all the way back to pre-Revolutionary days.

Cool and cool again!